Where Was I?

The title of this post is not so much a reference to my little blogging sabbatical as it is to the events of Easter weekend.  If you were at the Saturday night service you may have noticed I disappeared after the “Christ Is Risen” part and then reappeared at the very end to give out eggs.  I also wasn’t around for the Agape service, although I again reappeared, this time at the reception we had for His Eminence and Bishop McManus.  Here is what went down…

Some people have noticed that I (discretely) text/check text messages during church.  I do this for several reasons – to check for emergencies, to communicate with PC members in the narthex (I would much rather someone text me than stomp up during the service and come into the altar), and other things.  I generally check two or three times during a service – nothing heavy.  I received a message Sat. night from our chancellor asking if I could go to a nearby church and finish the service for the priest, who had collapsed and was taken to the hospital.  I checked in with Fr. Dean, grabbed Chris (our seminarian) and took off.  It was a funny scene in the parking lot – many people were leaving after receiving the light, and in the middle of it so was one of the priests!  About halfway to our destination I talked to the president of the parish council at the church to which we were going and he said everyone had gone home.  I came back to Worcester, went to the emergency room, visited the priest – a mentor of mine who is thankfully doing fine now – and then came back to the Cathedral.  I substituted for him at the Agape service on Easter Sunday morning, and that was that.  It was definitely one of the most memorable Easters ever!

Bright Week was quite busy – in many ways, busier than Holy Week, where we just had services.  Poetry readings, several liturgies, funerals and baptisms, a genocide memorial service at the College of the Holy Cross, and many other happenings kept me running, and this week has been equally full.  I did, however, plant some early crops and start on the garden – more on that later.


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